OSHA 30 – What You Need To Know


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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created over 40 years ago in an effort to reduce the number of hazardous work environments and promote the safety of workers. The results have been positive as evidenced by the decline in workplace injuries and illnesses.

Not all states mandate the completion of OSHA safety training but some states have made programs such as OSHA’s 30 hour Construction Industry Training course required for those working in the construction industry including HVAC professionals.

The OSHA 30 hour Construction Industry Training course is a comprehensive safety program designed for anyone working in the construction industry. Specifically developed for safety directors, foremen, and field supervisors; the program provides complete information on OSHA compliance issues. OSHA recommends Outreach Training Programs as an orientation to occupational safety and health for workers covered by OSHA 29 CFR 1926. Construction workers must receive additional training, when required by OSHA standards, on specific hazards of the job.

The topics covered by the OSHA 30 hour Construction Industry Training course are as follows:

  1. Intro to OSHA; General Health & Safety
  2. Management & OSHA
  3. Safety Work Procedures
  4. Environment Condition
  5. Trade Safety in the Workplace
  6. Worksite Accident Prevention
  7. Worksite Accident Planning & Analysis
  8. OSHA Inspection & the Voluntary Protective Program

When required by OSHA standards, some construction workers must complete additional training based on the hazards of their specific job. Workers in the HVAC industry may be required to complete the following additional training:

CONFINED SPACES IN CONSTRUCTION

Background: categories of confined spaces; welding, cutting, and heating in confined spaces; ventilation, control factors, combination hazards, hazardous atmospheres, physical hazards, retrieval systems, communications, rescue, respirators, and testing.

OSHA ACT AND HISTORY

OSHA’s purpose, origin of standards, coverage, duties, advisory committees, inspections, investigations, recordkeeping, citations, enforcement, 1926 subparts, and statistics.

OSHA INSPECTIONS, CITATIONS, MULTI EMPLOYER WORKSITES, AND FOCUSED INSPECTIONS

What to expect during and after an OSHA inspection, types of violations, consultation assistance, and the OSHA emergency hotline.

SUBPART C SAFETY AND HEALTH PROVISIONS

Contractor requirements, accident prevention, machinery and tools, training and experience, education, fire protection, housekeeping, illumination, sanitation, PPE, access to medical records, emergency plans, safety program elements, management commitment and leadership, and worksite analysis.

SUBPART D OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS

Medical services; sanitation; noise exposure; ionizing and non-ionizing radiation; gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists; illumination; ventilation; hazard communication; written program; labeling; MSDS; and training.

SUBPART F FIRE PROTECTION AND LADDERS PREVENTION

Flash point, flammable limits, types of fires and fire extinguishers, PASS method, flammable and combustible liquids, and dispensing flammable liquids.

SUBPART J WELDING

Hazard statistics, health hazards, protective clothing and equipment, torches, arc welding, fire prevention, ventilation, and the proper use and care of gas cylinders

SUBPART K ELECTRICAL

Requirements, hazards, wiring design and protection, grounding, hazardous locations, and safety related work practices.

SUBPART L: SCAFFOLDS

Scaffold platform construction, types of scaffolding, hazards, capacity, access, use, fall protection, aerial lifts, training, and inspection.

SUBPART M: FALL PROTECTION

Fall protection systems, leading edge work, hoist areas, holes and skylights, ramps, runways, walkways, excavations, dangerous equipment, overhand bricklaying, roofs, safety monitoring system, anchorage, lifelines, deceleration devices, warning devices, safety monitors, and fall protection plans.

SUBPART N: CRANES

Major causes of crane accidents, who is at risk, parts of a crane, types of cranes, pre-use planning, load capacity, hand signals, suspended loads, supporting surface, rigging equipment slings, and inspections.

SUBPART T DEMOLITION

Preparatory operations, hazards, stairs, passageways, chutes, removal of walls, masonry sections and chimneys, floors, storage, and blasting explosives.

SUBPART X STAIRWAYS AND LADDERS

Hazards, stairways, handrails, stair rails, stairs, temporary stairways, platforms and swing doors, ladders, and proper ladder use.

While OSHA recommends safety training for all construction professionals, there are currently 10 states that have particular OSHA training requirements in place. Some of these states enforce the facilitation of OSHA programs by issuing citations requiring the payment of administrative fees up to $2,500 and civil penalties up to $100 per day per employee found to be in noncompliance.

The following is a list of states requiring particular OSHA training and their requirements:

Connecticut: All construction workers for public building projects paid for (in part or in full) by state funding where the total cost is over $100,000 are required to take OSHA-authorized training.

Florida: All construction employees are required to take OSHA-authorized training prior to employment on any Miami-Dade County public or private contract valued in excess of $1,000,000.

Massachusetts: Construction workers for any public sector projects are required to take OSHA-authorized training.

Missouri: All construction workers on public work projects (state or municipal) are required to take OSHA-authorized training.

Nevada: All construction employees (10-hour) and supervisors (30-hour) are required to take OSHA-authorized training within 15 days of being hired.

New Hampshire: All construction workers on public works projects with a total cost over $100,000 are required to take OSHA-authorized training.

New York: All workers on public works contracts greater than $250,000 are required to take OSHA-authorized training (or a pre-approved equivalent program).

Pennsylvania: All employees (10-hour) and at least one supervisory employee (30-hour) of licensed contractors are required to take OSHA-authorized training if they are performing permitted construction or demolition work within the city of Philadelphia.

Rhode Island: All workers on municipal and state construction projects with a total cost of $100,000 or more are required to take OSHA-authorized training.

West Virginia: Workers on any public improvement project with a total cost in excess of $500,000 are required to take OSHA-authorized training.

With OSHA-authorized training available online from OSHA-approved providers, meeting state and federal training requirements does not have to be difficult. Even travel costs and time away from work are eliminated.

To find out more about OSHA requirements and training and find an authorized training provider see https://www.osha.gov/dte/outreach/.

Ruben Porras

Posted In: Safety

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